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24 Feb

This change was implemented subsequently in Protestant and Orthodox countries, usually at much later dates.

In England and Wales, Ireland, and the British colonies, the change of the start of the year and the changeover from the Julian calendar occurred in 1752 under the Calendar (New Style) Act 1750. designation is particularly relevant for dates which fall between the start of the "historical year" (1 January) and the official start date, where different.

Friday, 6 October 1867 was followed by Friday, 18 October.

Instead of 12 days, only 11 were skipped, and the day of the week was repeated on successive days, because at the same time the International Date Line was moved, from following Alaska's eastern border with Canada to following its new western border, now with Russia.

To reduce misunderstandings about the date, it was normal in parish registers to place a new year heading after 24 March (for example "1661") and another heading at the end of the following December, "1661/62", to indicate that in the following few weeks the year was 1661 Old Style but 1662 New Style.

From 1155 to 1752, the civil or legal year in England began on 25 March (Lady Day) The corresponding date in the Gregorian calendar is 9 February 1649, the date by which his contemporaries in some parts of continental Europe would have recorded his execution. During the years between the first introduction of the Gregorian calendar in continental Europe and its introduction in Britain, contemporary usage in England started to change.

Closely related is the custom of dual dating, where writers gave two consecutive years to reflect differences in the starting date of the year, or to include both the Julian and Gregorian dates.

Beginning in 1582, the Gregorian calendar replaced the Julian in Roman Catholic countries.

The European colonies of the Americas adopted the change when their mother countries did.

In Alaska, the change took place after the United States purchased Alaska from Russia.